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Fighting and bullying among Asian Americans and Latinos: Testing the roles of self-efficacy, ethnic identity, and ethnicity
Youth & Society (2016)
  • Cara S. Maffini, San Jose State University
  • Greg M. Kim-Ju, California State University, Sacramento
Abstract
This study examined ethnicity and ethnic identity (EI) as moderators in the relationship between self-efficacy (SE) and fighting and bullying. We sampled 315 Asian American and Latino early adolescents residing in an urban community. Results demonstrated that Latinos and male participants were more likely to engage in fighting and bullying than Asian Americans and females. Ethnicity and EI moderated the relationship for SE and fighting but not for SE and bullying. Findings suggest that EI and SE may serve as psychological resources that help reduce violence for Asian American and Latino early adolescents in more nuanced ways than previous research has shown. These findings address some of the conflicting findings regarding the role of EI in violence and bullying and suggest these behaviors may depend on the relationship between ethnicity and EI.
Keywords
  • urban youth violence,
  • ethnic identity,
  • self-efficacy,
  • early adolescence
Publication Date
February 23, 2016
DOI
10.1177/0044118X16630560
Publisher Statement
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Citation Information
Cara S. Maffini and Greg M. Kim-Ju. "Fighting and bullying among Asian Americans and Latinos: Testing the roles of self-efficacy, ethnic identity, and ethnicity" Youth & Society (2016) ISSN: 0044-118X
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/cara_maffini/14/