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When what you have is what you are: Self-uncertainty leads individualists to see themselves in their possessions
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (2011)
  • K. Rios Morrison, University of Chicago
  • Camille Johnson, San Jose State University
Abstract

Four studies tested whether uncertainty about the self-concept can motivate people, particularly individualists who define themselves in terms of their personal traits and characteristics, to perceive their material possessions as extensions of themselves (i.e., as self-expressive). In Study 1, European American participants rated their favorite pair of blue jeans as more self-expressive after being induced to feel self-uncertain, whereas Asian American participants did not. In Study 2, participants who scored high on a measure of individualism rated their cars as more self-expressive following a self-uncertainty manipulation. In Study 3, individualists (but not collectivists) rated their favorite possessions as more self-expressive after being subject to self-uncertainty; a manipulation of self-irrelevant uncertainty did not produce these results. In Study 4, thinking about a self-expressive (relative to utilitarian) possession bolstered self-certainty among individualists, but not collectivists. Implications for research on culture, the self-concept, and possessions are discussed.

Keywords
  • self-uncertainty,
  • possessions,
  • culture,
  • individualism,
  • self-expression
Publication Date
2011
Publisher Statement
SJSU users: use the following link to login and access the article via SJSU databases.
Citation Information
K. Rios Morrison and Camille Johnson. "When what you have is what you are: Self-uncertainty leads individualists to see themselves in their possessions" Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin Vol. 37 Iss. 5 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/camille_johnson/8/