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Not all selves feel the same uncertainty: Assimilation to primes among individualists and collectivists
Social Psychology and Personality Science (2012)
  • K. Rios Morrison, University of Chicago
  • Camille Johnson, San Jose State University
  • S. C. Wheeler, Stanford University
Abstract

Three experiments and a pilot study demonstrated that uncertainty about the self is uncomfortable (Pilot Study) and causes people to change their self-concepts in response to primes (Experiments 1–3), depending on both the nature of the uncertainty and how the self is defined. In Experiment 1, Asian Americans assimilated to a stereotype prime when made to feel uncertain about their collective selves, whereas European Americans assimilated to the prime when made to feel uncertain about their individual selves. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated the assimilation effect with a trait prime, and using individualism–collectivism instead of ethnicity as the moderator.

Keywords
  • individualism,
  • collectivism,
  • self-uncertainty,
  • priming
Publication Date
2012
Publisher Statement
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Citation Information
K. Rios Morrison, Camille Johnson and S. C. Wheeler. "Not all selves feel the same uncertainty: Assimilation to primes among individualists and collectivists" Social Psychology and Personality Science Vol. 3 Iss. 1 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/camille_johnson/6/