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Article
Effective Interpersonal Listening in the Personal Selling Environment: Conceptualization, Measurement, and Nomological Validity
Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice (1999)
  • Stephen B. Castleberry
  • C. David Shepherd, Georgia Southern University
Abstract

The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a measure of the degree to which salespeople practice effective listening. After defining and discussing the construct, the development of a paper-and-pencil self-report measure of interpersonal listening in the personal selling context (ILPS) is described. Following the procedure used by Spiro and Weitz (1990), the validity of the measure was assessed via a mail questionnaire with a sample of 604 salespeople from a variety of firms and industries. Both performance and sales experience were significantly correlated with the ILPS scale. There were no significant relationships between ILPS and gender, age, or industry type. The 14-item ILPS scale that emerged from the purification process was shown to have acceptable reliability estimates, as well as evidence of face, convergent, and nomological validity. Managerial implications and directions for future research are presented.

Keywords
  • Salespeople,
  • Effective listening,
  • Interpersonal listening,
  • Performance,
  • Sales performance,
  • Face validity,
  • Convergent validity,
  • Nomological validity
Publication Date
Winter 1999
Citation Information
Stephen B. Castleberry and C. David Shepherd. "Effective Interpersonal Listening in the Personal Selling Environment: Conceptualization, Measurement, and Nomological Validity" Journal of Marketing Theory and Practice Vol. 7 Iss. 1 (1999)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/c_david_shepherd/29/