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Comparison of Airway Intubation Devices When Using a Biohazard Suit: a Feasibility Study.
The American Journal of Emergency Medicine
  • Kevin Weaver, DO, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Gavin C Barr, Jr. MD, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Kayla R Long, DO, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Leonel Diaz, Jr.,DO, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Aaron S Ratner, DO, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Jeffery P Reboul, DO, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Dougals A Sturm, DO, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Marna R Greenberg, DO, MPH, FACEP, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Stephen W Dusza, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Bernadette Glenn-Porter, BS, Lehigh Valley Health Network
  • Bryan G Kane, MD, Lehigh Valley Health Network
Publication/Presentation Date
3-6-2015
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: We set out to compare emergency medicine residents' intubating times and success rates for direct laryngoscopy (DL), GlideScope-assisted intubation (GS), and the Supraglottic Airway Laryngopharyngeal Tube (SALT) airway with and without biohazard gear. METHODS: Each resident passed through 2 sets of 3 testing stations (DL, GS, SALT) in succession, intubating Laerdal mannequin heads with the 3 modalities after randomization to start with or without biohazard gear. RESULTS: Thirty-seven residents participated, and 27 were male (73%); 14 (37.8%) had prior experience intubating in biohazard suits. There was a statistically significant difference in those who had prior intubation experience between DL (37, 100%), GS (32, 86.5%), and SALT (12, 32.4%) (P < .001) and in median time to intubation (48 seconds, no suit; 57 seconds, with suits) (P = .03). There was no statistically significant difference between the overall times to intubate for the 3 devices. First-pass success was highest for DL (91.2%, no suit; 83.7%, suit) followed by GS (89%, no suit; 78.3%, suit) and SALT (51%, no suit; 67.6%, suit). CONCLUSION: A minority of participants had prior experience intubating in biohazard suits. Use of biohazard suits extends time to successful intubation. There was no difference in time to intubation for the 3 devices, but first-pass success was highest for DL (with or without biohazard gear).
Disciplines
PubMedID
25817200
Document Type
Article
Citation Information

Weaver, K. R., Barr, G. J., Long, K. R., Diaz, L. J., Ratner, A. S., Reboul, J. P., & ... Kane, B. G. (2015). Comparison of airway intubation devices when using a biohazard suit: a feasibility study. The American Journal Of Emergency Medicine, doi:10.1016/j.ajem.2015.02.051