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Unpublished Paper
THE COST OF DOING BUSINESS IN ASIA: A COMPARATIVE LEGAL STUDY OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS IN THE EMERGING MARKETS OF THAILAND, MALAYSIA, AND INDONESIA
ExpressO (2014)
  • Brooke R. Padgett, Florida Coastal School of Law
Abstract

Abstract: This article explores whether voluntary standards, customary law, or more binding bilateral investment treaties are best for corporations, the emerging markets of Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia, and the environment itself. While corporations, markets, and the environment facially seem to have divergent priorities, environmental disasters are more costly after the fact than they are to prevent so in reality their priorities may not be so different after all. Some of the potential issues the paper will examine and address are big picture macro level such as fairness to future generations, intergenerational rights; the actual cost through questions of polluter pays, who bears the risk, cost benefit analysis; prevention through avoidance as the main weapon, accountability, and compliance. This dilemma is three-dimensional regarding corporations, emerging market countries, and the environment; this paper will seek to explore those sides, and ultimately attempt to assist corporations in making the best choice to expand into these markets.

Keywords
  • international,
  • trade,
  • environmental,
  • emerging markets,
  • corporations
Publication Date
May 12, 2014
Citation Information
Brooke R. Padgett. "THE COST OF DOING BUSINESS IN ASIA: A COMPARATIVE LEGAL STUDY OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS IN THE EMERGING MARKETS OF THAILAND, MALAYSIA, AND INDONESIA" ExpressO (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/brooke_padgett/1/