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Sliding Rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: First Observation of Rocks in Motion
PLoS ONE
  • Richard D. Norris, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
  • James M. Norris, Interwoof
  • Ralph D. Lorenz, Johns Hopkins University
  • Jib Ray, Interwoof
  • Brian Jackson, Boise State University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
8-27-2014
Disciplines
Abstract

The engraved trails of rocks on the nearly flat, dry mud surface of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park, have excited speculation about the movement mechanism since the 1940s. Rock movement has been variously attributed to high winds, liquid water, ice, or ice flotation, but has not been previously observed in action. We recorded the first direct scientific observation of rock movements using GPS-instrumented rocks and photography, in conjunction with a weather station and time-lapse cameras. The largest observed rock movement involved >60 rocks on December 20, 2013 and some instrumented rocks moved up to 224 m between December 2013 and January 2014 in multiple move events. In contrast with previous hypotheses of powerful winds or thick ice floating rocks off the playa surface, the process of rock movement that we have observed occurs when the thin, 3 to 6 mm, “windowpane” ice sheet covering the playa pool begins to melt in late morning sun and breaks up under light winds of ~4–5 m/s. Floating ice panels 10 s of meters in size push multiple rocks at low speeds of 2–5 m/min. along trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the wind as well as that of the water flowing under the ice.

Copyright Statement

This document was originally published by PLOS in PLoS ONE. This work is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution License. Details regarding the use of this work can be found at: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105948

Citation Information
Richard D. Norris, James M. Norris, Ralph D. Lorenz, Jib Ray, et al.. "Sliding Rocks on Racetrack Playa, Death Valley National Park: First Observation of Rocks in Motion" PLoS ONE (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/brian_jackson/16/