Skip to main content
Presentation
Impact of Scaffolding Characteristics and Study Quality on Learner Outcomes in STEM Education: A meta-analysis
American Educational Research Association Conference (2012)
  • Brian Belland, Utah State University
  • Andrew Walker, Utah State University
  • M. Whitney Olsen, Utah State University
  • Heather Leary, University of Colorado at Boulder
Abstract

This paper employs meta-analysis to determine the impact of scaffold characteristics and study and assessment instrument quality on cognitive student outcomes in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education at the K-12, college, graduate, and adult levels. Studies were coded for necessary information for effect size calculation, contextual information, threats to internal and external validity, and assessment instrument validity and reliability. Results indicate (a) scaffolding positively impacts student learning (g = 0.53), (b) studies with zero threats to internal validity had lower effect sizes than studies with two threats, (c) studies with one threat to external validity had higher effect sizes than studies with zero threats to validity, (d) studies with no fading had higher effect sizes than studies with fixed fading, and (e) studies with conceptual scaffolds did better than studies with metacognitive scaffolds. There were no differences on the basis of study design, assessment level, or intended learning outcome.

Publication Date
April, 2012
Citation Information
Belland, B., Walker, A., Olsen, M. W., Leary, H. (2012, April). Impact of Scaffolding Characteristics and Study Quality on Learner Outcomes in STEM Education: A meta-analysis. Presentation at the American Educational Research Association, Vancouver, Canada.