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Unpublished Paper
The Federal Government’s History in Public Education: Massive Reform Efforts for Political and Corporate Enhancement
ExpressO (2014)
  • Brett A Geier, University of South Florida
Abstract

The role of the federal government in public education was purposefully absent in the formation of the United States Constitution. The Tenth Amendment delegated the power of educating the citizenry to each individual state. Therefore, each state in the nation has its own distinctive clause governing public education. The federal government's role was periphery at best. In 1965, President Johnson sought to mitigate poverty with an infusion of federal dollars for the nation's neediest students. As more funds were allocated by the federal government, the more restrictions and requirements were placed on schools. This accountability paradigm opened the door for legislators to develop legislation that required more of local schools, as long as they were accepting federal funds. Programs like NCLB and Race to the Top have created a model of punitive measures to prompt change. In addition, schools that do not meet the expectation are subject to transformation, restructuring or closure. The closure category has allowed for corporate entities to assume these schools, and their resources, under the self-proclaimed mantra of school-improvement. Yet, the results and motivations are highly suspect.

Keywords
  • Race to the Top,
  • NCLB,
  • History
Disciplines
Publication Date
January 13, 2014
Citation Information
Brett A Geier. "The Federal Government’s History in Public Education: Massive Reform Efforts for Political and Corporate Enhancement" ExpressO (2014)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/brett_geier/2/