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Article
Intuitive ethics: Understanding and critiquing the role of intuition in ethical decisions
Technical Communication Quarterly (1999)
  • Brenton Faber, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Abstract
This article examines the role intuition plays in forming ethical decisions. First, the article reviews examples of intuitive ethics in professional communication research. Second, the article suggests that intuition is the naturalization of dominant cultural values and beliefs. Third, the article considers naturalized values within institutions and organizations, demonstrating how naturalized values can lead to unquestioned and oppressive institutional practices. Ethical inquiry, according to this view, investigates and denaturalizes those assumptions that are carried forth by intuition. Fourth, the article offers a pedagogical example of this theory, demonstrating how a group of business communication students investigated the intuitive practices of a non‐profit organization. The article concludes by suggesting the value that a “critique of intuition” may have for the teaching, study, and practice of professional ethics.
Disciplines
Publication Date
March, 1999
Citation Information
Brenton Faber. "Intuitive ethics: Understanding and critiquing the role of intuition in ethical decisions" Technical Communication Quarterly Vol. 8 Iss. 2 (1999)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/brenton_faber/1/