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Article
Ethylene-Binding Activity, Gene-Expression Levels, and Receptor-System Output for Ethylene-Receptor Family Members from Arabidopsis and Tomato
The Plant Journal (2005)
  • Brad M. Binder, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • Ronan C. O'Malley, University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Fernando I Rodriguez, University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Jeffrey J. Esch, University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • Philip O'Donnell, University of Florida
  • Harry J. Klee, University of Florida
  • Anthony B. Bleecker, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Abstract
Ethylene signaling in plants is mediated by a family of ethylene receptors related to bacterial two-component regulators. Expression in yeast of ethylene-binding domains from the five receptor isoforms from Arabidopsis thaliana and five-receptor isoforms from tomato confirmed that all members of the family are capable of high-affinity ethylene-binding activity. All receptor isoforms displayed a similar level of ethylene binding on a per unit protein basis, while members of both subfamily I and subfamily II from Arabidopsis showed similar slow-release kinetics for ethylene. Quantification of receptor-isoform mRNA levels in receptor-deficient Arabidopsis lines indicated a direct correlation between total message level and total ethylene-binding activity in planta. Increased expression of remaining receptor isoforms in receptor-deficient lines tended to compensate for missing receptors at the level of mRNA expression and ethylene-binding activity, but not at the level of receptor signaling, consistent with specialized roles for family members in receptor signal output.
Keywords
  • ethylene receptor;signal transduction;plant hormone;membrane-associated receptor;ETR1
Publication Date
March, 2005
Citation Information
Brad M. Binder, Ronan C. O'Malley, Fernando I Rodriguez, Jeffrey J. Esch, et al.. "Ethylene-Binding Activity, Gene-Expression Levels, and Receptor-System Output for Ethylene-Receptor Family Members from Arabidopsis and Tomato" The Plant Journal Vol. 41 Iss. 5 (2005)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/brad_binder/4/