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About Christine L. Borgman

My research and teaching span information retrieval, human-computer interaction, information seeking and use, scholarly communication, and bibliometrics. Since the latter 1990s, these themes have converged in the study of data and data practices, exploring how observations, models, artifacts, and software become data; how these practices vary by individual and by discipline; and how these findings can be employed in the design of data collection, data management, data archiving, and science policy.

Publications remain the currency of scholarship, despite substantial evolution in form and function over a period of centuries. In the latter 20th century, data began to be viewed as scholarly products in their own right. Factors contributing to the value of research data include the transition from print to electronic publishing, the ability to acquire and analyze large volumes of digital content in the sciences and humanities alike, and policies that promote openness and transparency.

On the surface, open access to data appears to offer vast benefits for research, education, and innovation by leveraging public investments in research. Public policy documents suggest that releasing data is an easy task to be accomplished at the time of publishing articles or books, and that research data are yet another genre to be absorbed by libraries and archives. Underlying these simple claims is a morass of theoretical, social, policy, and practical problems. This morass has proven to be fertile ground for research in information studies.

How to use this site:
This site contains entries for most of my publications, presentations, and course syllabi. As governed by copyright agreements, entries may include final published versions, submitted versions, working documents, slides, abstracts, and metadata. Links to sources and to video recordings of presentations also are provided.

As most of my works cover multiple topics, the elaborate subject classification has been abandoned in favor of listing entries by format in reverse chronological order. Each entry has subject categories and topical tags (data, scholarly communication, information retrieval, bibliometrics, sensor networks, astronomy, humanities, and so on) that are searchable in the box at the bottom right of the page. Other links at the right lead to my UCLA homepage, research group, blog, Twitter feed, and email.

The site is updated regularly with new publications, presentations, and other works. Please subscribe to my mailing list for updates.

Positions

Present Professor & Presidential Chair in Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
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Research Interests

Data practices, scholarly communication, Information retrieval, digital libraries, human-computer interaction, and Information technology and policy


Contact Information

235 GSE&IS Bldg, UCLA
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1520

Email:


Books (7)

Articles, Papers, Posters, Reports, Book Chapters (123)

Article
科研数据共享的挑战 (The Conundrum of Sharing Research Data)
现代图书情报技术 (Modern Library and Information Technology) (2013)
Christine L Borgman
新型科研设备和研究方法的出现造成了前所未有的数据洪流。大量数据以及新型数据分布和挖掘方法激起资助机构、决策者和一般大众对于新的发现和创新的憧憬。众多利益相关者期盼数据可开放获取,然而至今数据共享也仅在天文学和基因组学等少数领域出现。在其他领域,一部分研究者会经常共享数据,其他研究者则从不共享数据,而其他大多数研究者则只愿意在某些时间共享某些数据。因此,数据共享仍是一个难题——一个错综复杂而又困难的问题。科研数据有很多形式,数据收集有很多目的,也采用很多方法,一旦离开了数据最初产生的背景则很难解释。本文以自然科学、社会科学和人文科学为例来分析说明数据类型和数据实践。作者考察了数据共享的4个理由:进行研究再现或验证;使公共资助研究的结果为公众所用;使其他人利用现有数据提出新的科学问题;提升研究和创新水平。因为不同的共享原因、不同的受益人、以及卷入其中的利益相关者的动机和激励,人们对这些理由的认识不同。数据共享的挑战就是理解什么数据应该被共享、被谁共享、和谁共享、在什么条件下共享、为什么共享以及要做什么努力等。回答这些问题将贯穿整个数据政策和数据实践。