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Article
Japanese technology policy for aged care
Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)
  • N. Dethlefs, University of Wollongong
  • Brian Martin, University of Wollongong
RIS ID
13383
Publication Date
1-2-2006
Publication Details
Dethlefs, N and Martin, B, Japanese technology policy for aged care, Science and Public Policy, 33(1), February 2006, 47-57. This article varies from the published version in minor ways.
Abstract
Aged care provision is a burning issue in Japan due to the country's unparalleled longevity and a fraying tradition of children caring for parents. Use of technology offers one approach to helping ease the increasing burden of aged care. Ways of using technology can be conveniently classified into three options. The first is to rely on well-tested technologies developed outside Japan. The second option is for significant Japanese investment in high-technology aged care supports, including robotics. The third option is for significant Japanese development in barrier-free technology, a low-technology direction. Articulating these options and spelling out their likely consequences helps to highlight some of the implicit value judgements involved in Japanese technology policy for aged care.
Citation Information
N. Dethlefs and Brian Martin. "Japanese technology policy for aged care" (2006)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/bmartin/26/