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The eco-political perspective: Tiger conservation in Bangladesh as case study
Tigerpaper: United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization's (UN-FAO) Regional Asia Pacific (RAP) Journal (2010)
  • Mohammed Ashraf
Abstract
Tigers evolved from the genus Panthera approximately two million years ago during the Cenozoic era and were widely distributed in China and Southeast Asia. They then expanded their range northwards into Russia, Japan and Korea, and south and westwards into the Indian subcontinent and Caspian regions about one million years ago. Tigers branched off as a distinct species under the Panthera genus long before lion Panthera leo, leopard Panthera pardus, and jaguar Panthera onca. Tiger is essentially an Asian species and the fossil evidence suggests that it has never been found on any other continents, primarily due to the geo-climatic factors that shaped its ecological niche, along with its obligate mode of adaptation which is primarily based on preying on large ungulate mammals from tropical and sub-tropical monsoonal forests and riparian grassland ecosystems in South Asia. Empirical evidence suggests that in the 19th century there were over 100,000 tigers living in Asia, but by the turn of the mid 20th century, tiger numbers had astronomically plummeted to less than 10,000 across its range nations – due to the large scale British colonial hunting regime administered fashionably and ruthlessly to systematically kill tigers and other charismatic species in the Indian subcontinent.
Keywords
  • Tiger Conservation,
  • Ecology,
  • Conservation Biology,
  • Wildlife Ecology,
  • Bangladesh Sundarbans,
  • Mangrove Ecosystem,
  • Eco-Politics,
  • Sundarbans,
  • Bengal Tiger,
  • Biodiversity,
  • Wetland,
  • Ramsar Site,
  • Population Ecology
Publication Date
Fall October, 2010
Citation Information
Mohammed Ashraf. "The eco-political perspective: Tiger conservation in Bangladesh as case study" Tigerpaper: United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization's (UN-FAO) Regional Asia Pacific (RAP) Journal (2010)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/biocentrism/13/