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Presentation
Can consistent data collection and modeling strategies provide the information necessary to address instream water quality impairments?
Spring Runoff Conference (2012)
  • Andrew Hobson, Utah State University
  • Bethany T Neilson, Utah State University
  • Nicholas Von Stackelberg
Abstract

Stream water quality and the influence of external loads is commonly understood through the aid of mathematical models that incorporate the influences of biological, chemical, and physical processes. Such models require forcing, population, and calibration/validation data to effectively predict the influences of proposed management strategies. The State of Utah (DWQ) has recently identified QUAL2Kw as the primary water quality model to aid in developing waste load allocation permits as well as assist in determining statewide instream nutrient criteria. In applying this model throughout the state, there were questions regarding the data types and the temporal and spatial frequency necessary to accurately populate the model. This led to the development of a consistent data collection strategy to support model population and calibration. Further, a step-wise procedure was developed for summarizing the data for model population and using different data types to set specific parameters. This was followed by a combined manual and automatic calibration approach. To test these methods, nine field studies were conducted within central and northern Utah streams that receive wastewater effluent. Associated model applications have resulted in defensible predictions and decreased uncertainty in some parameters. However, key issues have been identified within the data collection and modeling approaches that require consideration when interpreting model predictions.

Keywords
  • Water Quality Modeling,
  • data collection,
  • QUAL2Kw
Publication Date
Spring April 3, 2012
Citation Information
Andrew Hobson, Bethany T Neilson and Nicholas Von Stackelberg. "Can consistent data collection and modeling strategies provide the information necessary to address instream water quality impairments?" Spring Runoff Conference (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/bethany_neilson/67/