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Article
Root Shock Revisited: Perspectives of Early Head Start Mothers on Community and Policy Environments and Their Effects on Child Health, Development, and School Readiness
American Journal of Public Health (2009)
  • Carol L. McAllister
  • Tammy L. Thomas
  • Patrick C. Wilson
  • Beth L. Green, Portland State University
Abstract

Racial differences in school readiness are a form of health disparity. By examining, from the perspective of low-income minority families participating in an Early Head Start study, community and policy environments as they shape and inform lived experiences, we identified several types of social and economic dislocation that undermine the efforts of parents to ready their children for school. The multiple dislocations of community triggered by housing and welfare reform and “urban renewal” are sources of stress for parents and children and affect the health and development of young children. Our findings suggest that racial differences in school readiness result not from race but from poverty and structural racism in American society.

Keywords
  • Social service -- Research -- Methodology,
  • Social work with youth -- United States,
  • Head Start programs -- United States
Publication Date
February, 2009
Publisher Statement
Copyright (2009) American Public Health Association *At the time of publication, Beth Green was affiliated with NPC Research
Citation Information
Carol L. McAllister, Tammy L. Thomas, Patrick C. Wilson and Beth L. Green. "Root Shock Revisited: Perspectives of Early Head Start Mothers on Community and Policy Environments and Their Effects on Child Health, Development, and School Readiness" American Journal of Public Health Vol. 99 Iss. 2 (2009)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/beth_green/15/