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Article
Gender and motor competence affects perceived likelihood and importance of physical activity outcomes among 14 year olds
Child: Care, Health and Development
  • Beth Hands, University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Helen Parker, University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Elizabeth Rose, University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Dawn Larkin
Year of Publication
2015
Abstract
Little is understood about the impact of level of motor competence on self-perceptions in adolescence, in particular how this may differentially affect girls and boys. A sample of 1,568 14-year-old participants (766 girls and 802 boys) were grouped into four motor competence levels (very low to high) based on the McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development (MAND). Self-perceptions were assessed using the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents. Boys had higher self-perceptions of global self-worth, athletic competence, and physical appearance, whereas girls had higher scores for close friendships and behavioral conduct. Main effects in the predicted direction were found for motor competence for self-perceptions of global self-worth, athletic competence, physical appearance, close friendships, social acceptance, and romantic appeal. These findings indicate that level of motor competence is important in many aspects of self-perceptions, affecting girls and boys differently. Higher motor competence has a protective effect on psychosocial health, particularly for girls.
Keywords
  • Raine study,
  • gender,
  • self-perceptions,
  • adolescents,
  • Harter,
  • MAND Introduction
Citation Information
Beth Hands, Helen Parker, Elizabeth Rose and Dawn Larkin. "Gender and motor competence affects perceived likelihood and importance of physical activity outcomes among 14 year olds" Child: Care, Health and Development Vol. Early View (Online First) (2015) ISSN: 0305-1862
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/beth-hands/5/