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Article
Does motor competence affect self-perceptions differently for adolescent males and females?
SAGE Open
  • Elizabeth Rose, University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Dawne Larkin
  • Helen Parker, University of Notre Dame Australia
  • Beth Hands, University of Notre Dame Australia
Year of Publication
2015
Abstract
Little is understood about the impact of level of motor competence on self-perceptions in adolescence, in particular how this may differentially affect girls and boys. A sample of 1,568 14-year-old participants (766 girls and 802 boys) were grouped into four motor competence levels (very low to high) based on the McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development (MAND). Self-perceptions were assessed using the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents. Boys had higher self-perceptions of global self-worth, athletic competence, and physical appearance, whereas girls had higher scores for close friendships and behavioral conduct. Main effects in the predicted direction were found for motor competence for self-perceptions of global self-worth, athletic competence, physical appearance, close friendships, social acceptance, and romantic appeal. These findings indicate that level of motor competence is important in many aspects of self-perceptions, affecting girls and boys differently. Higher motor competence has a protective effect on psychosocial health, particularly for girls.
Keywords
  • adolescence,
  • male,
  • female,
  • McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development (MAND)
Citation Information
Elizabeth Rose, Dawne Larkin, Helen Parker and Beth Hands. "Does motor competence affect self-perceptions differently for adolescent males and females?" SAGE Open Vol. 5 Iss. 4 (2015) ISSN: 2158-2440
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/beth-hands/18/