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Article
Short stature with normal growth hormone stimulation testing: lack of evidence for partial growth hormone deficiency or insensitivity
Pediatric Publications and Presentations
  • Benjamin U. Nwosu, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Marilena Coco, National Institutes of Health
  • Joy Jones, National Institutes of Health
  • Kevin M. Barnes, National Institutes of Health
  • Jack A. Yanovski, National Institutes of Health
  • Jeffrey Baron, National Institutes of Health
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology
Date
7-17-2004
Document Type
Article
Medical Subject Headings
Adolescent; Adrenergic alpha-Agonists; Arginine; Body Weight; Child; Clonidine; Dwarfism, Pituitary; Female; Humans; Insulin; Insulin-Like Growth Factor I; Levodopa; Male; Retrospective Studies
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that children with short stature and peak stimulated GH (pGH) of 7-10 microg/l have partial GH deficiency and to test the hypothesis that short children with normal pGH but low IGF-I levels have partial GH deficiency or partial GH insensitivity. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: Retrospective analysis of the clinical and biochemical profiles of 76 children who underwent an evaluation for short stature (height < 5th percentile) that included two, sex steroid-primed GH stimulation tests. RESULTS: Patients with pGH < 7 microg/l (n = 14) differed significantly from those with pGH > 7 microg/l (n = 62), having greater midparental height (MPH) SDS, a greater disparity between height SDS and MPH SDS, and lower IGF-I SDS. Patients with pGH of 7-10 microg/l (n = 12) did not have characteristics intermediate between those with pGH < 7 microg/l and those with pGH > or = 10 microg/l, but instead resembled those with pGH > or = 10 microg/l. Patients with pGH > or = 7 microg/l, but low IGF-I (< -2 SDS) (n = 5), did not show characteristics intermediate between those with pGH < 7 microg/l and those with pGH > or = 7 microg/l and normal IGF-I. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support either the hypothesis that children with pGH of 7-10 microg/l have partial GH deficiency or the hypothesis that children with normal pGH but subnormal IGF-I levels have partial GH deficiency or insensitivity.
Rights and Permissions
Citation: Horm Res. 2004;62(2):97-102. Epub 2004 Jul 13. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
15256821
Citation Information
Benjamin U. Nwosu, Marilena Coco, Joy Jones, Kevin M. Barnes, et al.. "Short stature with normal growth hormone stimulation testing: lack of evidence for partial growth hormone deficiency or insensitivity" Vol. 62 Iss. 2 (2004) ISSN: 0301-0163 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/benjamin_nwosu/1/