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Article
Social beliefs as determinants of attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help among ethnically diverse university students
Canadian Journal of Counselling
  • B.C.H Kuo, University of Windsor
  • Catherine T. Kwantes, University of Windsor
  • Shelagh Towson, University of Windsor
  • Kathleen M. Nanson
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2006
Disciplines
Abstract
English The present study examined the role of pancultural social beliefs, as measured by the Social Axioms Survey (SAS), in predicting attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help in an ethnically-diverse sample of Canadian university students (N=400). The result of a hierarchical regression showed that the collective contribution of the six SAS factors was significant in explaining help-seeking attitudes. Overall, gender, age, ethnicity, perceived stress, and two SAS factors (Social Cynicism and Interpersonal Harmony) emerged as the significant predictors of help-seeking attitudes. There were also gender and ethnic differences in help-seeking attitudes, perceived stress, and across the six SAS factors.
Comments

This article was first published in the Canadian Journal of Counselling (http://www.cjc-rcc.ucalgary.ca/cjc/index.php/rcc/article/view/302/202).

Citation Information
B.C.H Kuo, Catherine T. Kwantes, Shelagh Towson and Kathleen M. Nanson. "Social beliefs as determinants of attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help among ethnically diverse university students" Canadian Journal of Counselling Vol. 40 Iss. 4 (2006) p. 224 - 241
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ben-kuo/4/