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Article
Indigenous crisis counselling in Taiwan: An exploratory qualitative case study of an expert therapist
International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling
  • B.C.H Kuo, University of Windsor
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2011
DOI
10.1007/s10447-010-9108-y
Keywords
  • Crisis counseling,
  • Indigenous,
  • Taiwan,
  • Chinese,
  • Qualitative case study
Disciplines
Abstract
In this study, we adopted a single qualitative case study method to explore and examine indigenous approaches to crisis counseling in Taiwan, through the distinct lens of an expert Taiwanese counseling psychologist. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted with the psychologist (as the case) to document her lived clinical experiences counseling a grief-stricken Taiwanese family in crisis (as the context). Using open-code data analysis, five cultural themes were abstracted from the interviews: a) significance of counselor’s authority and expertness; b) primacy of client-counselor rapport and relationship; c) centrality of collective familism; d) observance of indigenous grief response and process; and e) adherence to face-saving communication and interpersonal patterns. Implications for implementing crisis counseling practice and research with native Taiwanese/Chinese clients based on these preliminary findings are discussed.
Comments

The final publication is available at link.springer.com (http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10447-010-9108-y)

Citation Information
B.C.H Kuo. "Indigenous crisis counselling in Taiwan: An exploratory qualitative case study of an expert therapist" International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling Vol. 33 Iss. 1 (2011) p. 1 - 21
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ben-kuo/20/