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Presentation
The Stylistic and Social Dimensions of Popular Band Music and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in Ghana
A Paper presentation at the Two Day International Conference on the Life and Works of Professor Emeritus J H K Nketia --Nketia Festschrift-- organized by the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon on 23rd and 24 September, 2011 at the Kwame Nkrumah Complex, Univ of Ghana, Legon (2011)
Abstract
This study is a thematic one that cuts across the Akan, Ewe, Frafra and Gurunsi tribes of Ghana. The symbolic meanings and significance of some of the dances that go along with the playing of Popular Band Music in the aforementioned "tribal areas" have been explored and documented. The definition of concepts in this exercise leans heavily on Nketia's (1963) definition of Popular Bands as a group "of musicians in associative relationship, organized for the making of music and remaining so, for as long as the particular form of music they make are popularly supported or patronized." The information gathering tools that were adopted deviated slightly from the "anthropological model" (Nketia) which is often used in such a study of musicology in Africa--often narrowing down on a single tribe or society. The inter-tribal approach adopted herein--therefore--seeks to throw further light on the social, political and religious institutions which often cut-across Ghana, and, how these institutions could be developed through popular band music.
 
Keywords
  • Popular Band Music,
  • Indigenous Knowledge Systems,
  • Ghana
Disciplines
Publication Date
Fall September 24, 2011
Comments
Kindly see page8 of Abstracts Book for student's submission. Thank you
Citation Information
"The Stylistic and Social Dimensions of Popular Band Music and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in Ghana" A Paper presentation at the Two Day International Conference on the Life and Works of Professor Emeritus J H K Nketia --Nketia Festschrift-- organized by the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon on 23rd and 24 September, 2011 at the Kwame Nkrumah Complex, Univ of Ghana, Legon (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/beep/15/