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Populating Your Institutional Repository and Promoting Your Students: IRs and Undergraduate Research
Making Institutional Repositories Work
  • Betty Rozum, Utah State University
  • Becky L. Thoms, Utah State University
Document Type
Contribution to Book
Publication Date
1-1-2016
Abstract
Establishing institutional repositories (IRs) and encouraging supportive faculty participation can be daunting. Gaining access to scholarly publica- tions and other products that students produce, especially undergraduate researchers, can be an even more challenging task. Many IRs contain gradu- ate theses and dissertations as well as undergraduate honors theses and the abstracts of work that students present at student research events or con- ferences. It is less common to find IRs whose compilers thoroughly collect student scholarship from all aspects of students’ research activities, which can demonstrate the academic involvement of both a university’s student population and the faculty who collaborate with their students (Barandiaran, Rozum, & Thoms, 2014). When an opportunity arose at Utah State University’s Merrill-Cazier Library to begin such a process, a partnership was born that benefits students, faculty members, and the library. This case study describes the evolution and benefits of that partnership.
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Published by Purdue University Press.

Citation Information
Rozum, B., & Thoms, B. (2016). Populating Your Institutional Repository and Promoting Your Students: IRs and Undergraduate Research. In Making Institutional Repositories Work (pp. 311–318). West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press.