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Use of a FITLINE to Support Families of Overweight and Obese Children in Pediatric Practices
Pediatric Publications and Presentations
  • Lori Pbert, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Susan Druker, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Bruce A. Barton, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Barbara C. Olendzki, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Victoria A. Andersen, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Gioia M. Persuitte, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jennifer Bram, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Stephen Kurtz, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • E. Michael Powers, Vanderbilt University
  • Sybil L. Crawford, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Alan C. Geller, Harvard School of Public Health
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine; Department of Quantitative Health Sciences; Department of Pediatrics
Date
2-1-2016
Document Type
Article
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends a staged approach to pediatric weight management, starting with helping families to make targeted dietary and activity changes. This pilot study evaluated the preliminary efficacy of a pediatric practice-based referral program to support parents in helping their overweight/obese children improve their weight-related behaviors and BMI.

METHODS: A nonrandomized intervention study with contemporaneous control was used. Parents and their children ages 8-12 with BMI > /=85th percentile (N = 37) were recruited from a pediatric practice serving a low-income, multiethnic population. Providers delivered brief intervention and referred families to six weekly FITLINE telephone counseling sessions with a nutritionist who guided parents in helping their child make AAP-recommended changes. Child BMI and parent survey of child diet and physical activity were completed at baseline and 3 months. Medical record data from 44 children matched for age and BMI were collected.

RESULTS: Mean change in BMI from baseline to 3-month follow-up was -0.49 BMI units (standard deviation [SD], 0.95; p = 0.007) for the FITLINE group and 0.35 BMI units (SD, 0.96; p = 0.02) for the control group. Adjusting for baseline BMI, age, and sex, children in the FITLINE condition reduced BMI significantly more than children in the control condition (mean difference = -0.89; p = 0.0003). Significant improvements in many dietary and sedentary behaviors also were noted.

CONCLUSIONS: The FITLINE program reduced short-term BMI and improved dietary and sedentary behaviors. A randomized, controlled trial is warranted to assess the program's efficacy and potential to serve as a model for reducing obesity in pediatric practice.

Rights and Permissions
Citation: Child Obes. 2016 Feb;12(1):33-43. doi: 10.1089/chi.2015.0101. Epub 2016 Jan 20. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to Article in PubMed
PubMed ID
26788762
Citation Information
Lori Pbert, Susan Druker, Bruce A. Barton, Barbara C. Olendzki, et al.. "Use of a FITLINE to Support Families of Overweight and Obese Children in Pediatric Practices" Vol. 12 Iss. 1 (2016) ISSN: 2153-2168 (Linking)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/barbara_olendzki/81/