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Article
Randomized trial of a literacy-sensitive, culturally tailored diabetes self-management intervention for low-income latinos: latinos en control
Preventive and Behavioral Medicine Publications and Presentations
  • Milagros C. Rosal, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Ira S. Ockene, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Angela Restrepo, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Mary Jo White, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Amy Borg, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Barbara C. Olendzki, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Jeffrey Scavron, Brightwood Health Center/Tufts University
  • Lucy M. Candib, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Garry Welch, Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University
  • George W. Reed, University of Massachusetts Medical School
UMMS Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine; Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology; Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
Publication Date
4-4-2011
Document Type
Article
Subjects
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Health Literacy; Poverty; Self Care; Hispanic Americans
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To test whether a theory-based, literacy, and culturally tailored self-management intervention, Latinos en Control, improves glycemic control among low-income Latinos with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 252 patients recruited from community health centers were randomized to the Latinos en Control intervention or to usual care. The primarily group-based intervention consisted of 12 weekly and 8 monthly sessions and targeted knowledge, attitudes, and self-management behaviors. The primary outcome was HbA(1c). Secondary outcomes included diet, physical activity, blood glucose self-monitoring, diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and other physiological factors (e.g., lipids, blood pressure, and weight). Measures were collected at baseline and at 4- and 12-month follow-up. Change in outcomes over time between the groups and the association between HbA(1c) and possible mediators were estimated using mixed-effects models and an intention-to-treat approach. RESULTS: A significant difference in HbA(1c) change between the groups was observed at 4 months (intervention -0.88 [-1.15 to -0.60] versus control -0.35 [-0.62 to 0.07], P < 0.01), although this difference decreased and lost statistical significance at 12 months (intervention -0.46 [-0.77 to -0.13] versus control -0.20 [-0.53 to 0.13], P = 0.293). The intervention resulted in significant change differences in diabetes knowledge at 12 months (P = 0.001), self-efficacy (P = 0.001), blood glucose self-monitoring (P = 0.02), and diet, including dietary quality (P = 0.01), kilocalories consumed (P < 0.001), percentage of fat (P = 0.003), and percentage of saturated fat (P = 0.04). These changes were in turn significantly associated with HbA(1c) change at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Literacy-sensitive, culturally tailored interventions can improve diabetes control among low-income Latinos; however, strategies to sustain improvements are needed.
Keywords
  • UMCCTS funding
DOI of Published Version
10.2337/dc10-1981
Source
Diabetes Care. 2011 Apr;34(4):838-44. Epub 2011 Mar 4. DOI:10.2337/dc10-1981. Link to article on publisher's site
Related Resources
Link to article in PubMed
PubMed ID
21378213
Citation Information
Milagros C. Rosal, Ira S. Ockene, Angela Restrepo, Mary Jo White, et al.. "Randomized trial of a literacy-sensitive, culturally tailored diabetes self-management intervention for low-income latinos: latinos en control" Vol. 34 Iss. 4 (2011)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/barbara_olendzki/22/