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Mousike techne: The Philosophical Practice of Music in Plato, Nietzsche, and Heidegger
Articles and Chapters in Academic Book Collections
  • Babette Babich, Fordham University
Comments
Babich, "Mousike Techne: The Philosophical Practice of Music in Plato, Nietzsche, and Heidegger" in: Massimo Verdicchio and Robert Burch, eds., Between Philosophy and Poetry: Writing Rhythm History. London: Continuum, 2005. Pp. 171-180 and 200-205.
Publication Date
1-1-2005
Abstract
After retracing the breadth of the definition of music in antiquity to the end of justifying the sense in which one may speak of 'the music of philosophy' as Plato's Socrates does, this essay re-reads the Platonic distinction between philosophy as the highest kind of music and performative, as heard or played sung music as a lower form. It then turns to an exploration of Nietzsche's writing style conceived on a muscial model precisely qua aphoristic and concludes with a review of Heidegger's thought as musically composed or adumbrated.
Citation Information
Babette Babich. "Mousike techne: The Philosophical Practice of Music in Plato, Nietzsche, and Heidegger" (2005)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/babette_babich/13/