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Article
Temperament as a moderator of the effects of parental depressive symptoms on child behavior problems.
Social Development
  • A.C. Jessee
  • S.C. Mangelsdorf
  • Aya Shigeto, Nova Southeastern University
  • M. Wong
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2012
Disciplines
Abstract
Parental depressive symptomatology has consistently been linked to child maladjustment, but these effects are not universal. This investigation examined the role of child temperament as a moderator of the effects of parental depression on behavior problems in five-year-old children. Parents reported on their own depressive symptoms, and both parents and teachers reported on child behavior. Temperament was assessed by both parent-report and structured observation. Results indicated significant associations between behavior problems and both depressive symptoms (maternal and paternal) and child temperament (effortful control and negative affect). Child surgency moderated the effects of both maternal and paternal depressive symptoms on child behavior problems. Child negative affect and incongruous negative emotionality moderated the effects of maternal depressive symptoms on child behavior problems. These findings point to the importance of examining multiple factors within the family system to further understand the processes of child development.
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9507.2011.00639.x
Citation Information
A.C. Jessee, S.C. Mangelsdorf, Aya Shigeto and M. Wong. "Temperament as a moderator of the effects of parental depressive symptoms on child behavior problems." Social Development Vol. 21 (2012) p. 610 - 627 ISSN: 0961-205X
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/aya-shigeto/36/