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Article
Diversity through Inclusion: African American Women with Incarcerated Mates-The Silent Majority.
National Organization of Human Services Conference (2016)
  • Avon M Hart-Johnson, PhD
Abstract
This article illuminates how African American women who are in relationships with incarcerated mates have become the hidden victims of mass incarceration - women, suffering as a silent majority. This paper introduces Hart-Johnson’s (2014) research study and grounded theory, Symbolic Imprisonment, Grief, and Coping, as an explanation for the psychosocial responses and coping mechanisms of African American women affected by this phenomenon. The majority of the women in this study described self-induced psychological and physical states of vicarious imprisonment, as if they, too, were serving a prison sentence or were, symbolically, in home confinement. These findings offer human service scholar-practitioners insights into non-death grief and symbolic imprisonment within the context of separation and loss and having a confined loved one. Finally, this paper offers grief counseling modalities as a possible intervention for this population.

Publication Date
Winter 2016
Citation Information
Hart-Johnson, A. (2016). Diversity through Inclusion: African American Women with Incarcerated Mates-The Silent Majority. In 2015 NOHS National Conference–Charlotte, NC (p. 96).