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Article
Understanding the Career Choice for Underrepresented Minority Doctoral Students in Science and Engineering
Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering (2013)
  • Audrey J. Jaeger, North Carolina State University at Raleigh
  • Karen J. Haley, Portland State University
  • Frim D. Ampaw, Central Michigan University
  • John S. Levin, University of California - Riverside
Abstract

This study explored the career choices of underrepresented science, technology, engineering, and mathematics minority graduate students through the lens of identity theory. Twelve participants from a research university in the West participated in in-depth interviews. Themes were developed using work from Holland et al. (Identity and Agency in Cultural Worlds, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998) including figured worlds, positionality, self-authoring, and agency. Positionality, as described by students' roles in academia, appeared to be influenced by the nature of "doing" science and engineering. Graduate students in this study found the world of academia in conflict with their own values and identity. What they wanted as a career was often inconsistent with their perceptions of what they observed in a faculty role at a research university.

Keywords
  • Career choice,
  • Doctoral students
Publication Date
2013
Publisher Statement
DOI: 10.1615/JWomenMinorScienEng.2013005361
Citation Information
Audrey J. Jaeger, Karen J. Haley, Frim D. Ampaw and John S. Levin. "Understanding the Career Choice for Underrepresented Minority Doctoral Students in Science and Engineering" Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering Vol. 19 Iss. 1 (2013)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/audrey_jaeger/1/