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Human Genes and Neoliberal Governance. A Foucauldian Critique. (NEW PAPERBACK EDITION, SEPT. 2009)
Routledge-Cavendish (2008)
  • Antoinette Rouvroy
Abstract
Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault, among others, Human Genes and Neoliberal Governance shows how the privileging of genetic explanations about individual risks, over environmental and socioeconomic factors, reflects both a metaphysical and a political complicity between 'geneticisation' and neoliberalism. The 'new human genetics' does not transform what it is to be human as much as shift the place we look at when we try to characterise commonalities and variations among the human species. The 'genetic revolution' is above all a perceptual revolution, and in the first part of this book Antoinette Rouvroy explores the social, political and economic conditions and consequences of this new 'perceptual regime'. In the second part of this book she pursues her analysis through a consideration of the impact of 'geneticisation' on political support of the welfare state, and on the operation of private health and life insurance. Genetics and neoliberalism, she argues, are complicit in fostering the belief that social and economic patterns have a fixed nature beyond the reach of democratic deliberation, and that the characteristics of individuals are unusually plastic, and within the scope of individual choice and responsibility. 'Geneticisation', it is concluded, has come to provide a questionable and largely unacknowledged support for neoliberal governance.
Publication Date
2008
Citation Information
Antoinette Rouvroy. "Human Genes and Neoliberal Governance. A Foucauldian Critique. (NEW PAPERBACK EDITION, SEPT. 2009)" Routledge-Cavendish (2008)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/antoinette_rouvroy/3/