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Article
Redesigning a Child Development Laboratory Program to Meet the Changing Needs of Students, Faculty, and Parents
Early Childhood Teacher Education
  • Shelley L. Knudsen Lindauer
  • Ann Marie Berghout Austin, Utah State University
Document Type
Article
Publisher
Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Publication Date
1-1-1999
DOI
10.1080/0163638990200109
Disciplines
Abstract
Since the first child development laboratory school opened its doors in the 1920s (Wortham, 1992), the fields of child development and early childhood education have looked to child development laboratory programs as essential contributors of knowledge about theory and practice (Osborne, 1991). Traditionally, laboratory programs have operated under a three-pronged mission: 1) training pre-service and inservice early childhood education and child development professionals; 2) conducting and disseminating research; and 3) serving children and families. It is not surprising that this mission has mirrored the foci of Land Grant Universities, institutions that have been instrumental in nurturing laboratory programs' growth and development in the past seven decades (Osborne, 1991). As McBride (1996) notes, by effectively combining these three mission components, laboratory programs play a vital role in "articulating the interconnections between theory, research, and practice in the early childhood field" (p. 17). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how one child development laboratory school, without additional space or monetary resources, expanded its program to not only increase the number and ages of children served, but more clearly address the mission of a laboratory program.
Citation Information
Redesigning a Child Development Laboratory Program to Meet the Changing Needs of Students, Faculty, and Parents. Shelley L. Knudsen Lindauer and Ann M. Berghout Austin, Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 1999, 20 (1) 59-65.