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Toddlers' food preferences: Concordance with family members' preferences
JOURNAL OF NUTRITION EDUCATION (1998)
  • J Skinner, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • B R Carruth, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • J Moran, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • K Houck, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • J Schmidhammer, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • Ann Reed, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • F Coletta, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • R Cotter, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
  • D Ott, University of Tennessee - Knoxville
Abstract

To determine the food preferences of toddlers and the concordance with preferences of their family members, 118 children, ages 28 to 36 months, were assessed with a written questionnaire completed by their mothers. The questionnaire included 196 foods commonly eaten across the U.S. Response categories were [food] never offered, never tasted, [child] likes and eats, dislikes but eats,likes but does not eat, and dislikes and does not eat. Similar questionnaires were completed by mothers (n = 117), fathers (n = 96), and an older sibling (n = 47) of the child. Results indicated strong concordance (82.0-83.3%) of food preferences between the child and other family members. Similarity between foods never offered to the child and the mother's dislikes was significant at p = .005. On the average, children had been offered 77.8% of the 196 foods and liked 81.1% of the foods offered to them. Foods liked and eaten by over 95% of the children included French fries, pizza, potato chips, apple juice, bananas, saltine crackers, spaghetti, biscuits, rolls (white), and popcorn. No single food was disliked and not eaten by a majority of the children. Results suggest that the most limiting category related to food preferences were those foods never offered to the child.

Disciplines
Publication Date
1998
Citation Information
J Skinner, B R Carruth, J Moran, K Houck, et al.. "Toddlers' food preferences: Concordance with family members' preferences" JOURNAL OF NUTRITION EDUCATION Vol. 30 Iss. 1 (1998)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/ann-reed/55/