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Nonmedical information seeking amid conflicting health information: negative and positive effects on prostate cancer screening
Health Communication (2015)
  • Laura Gibson, University of Pennsylvania
  • Andy SL Tan, Harvard University
  • Derek Freres, University of Pennsylvania
  • Nehama Lewis, University of Haifa
  • Lourdes Martinez, Michigan State University
  • Robert C Hornik, University of Pennsylvania
Abstract

This study investigates the impact of seeking information about the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test on men’s PSA test use during a period of conflicting recommendations. Analyses used longitudinal survey data collected in 2005 and 2006 from a nationally representative sample of U.S. males aged 40–70 years (n = 777). Cross-sectionally, nonmedical information seeking was significantly associated with increased odds of having a PSA test in the past year (Time 1 odds ratio [OR] = 9.74, p < .01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.37, 21.70; Time 2 OR = 5.78, p < .01, 95% CI = 3.17, 10.55). However, lagged analyses showed that among men who had a PSA at Time 1, active seeking is associated with reduced odds of later having a PSA test (OR = 0.33, p < .05, 95% CI = 0.13, 0.85). Participants who had not had a PSA test in the past year very rarely sought information about PSA tests. Information acquisition in an environment of conflicting recommendations may influence adoption of cancer screening behaviors.

Disciplines
Publication Date
September 11, 2015
Citation Information
Laura Gibson, Andy SL Tan, Derek Freres, Nehama Lewis, et al.. "Nonmedical information seeking amid conflicting health information: negative and positive effects on prostate cancer screening" Health Communication (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/andysltan/29/