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Unpublished Paper
The Effect of the Cable Television Compulsory License on Program Supply in a Deregulated Environment
(1982)
  • Andrew G Ogden
Abstract
The 1976 revision of the Copyright Act declined to impose full copyright liability on cable television for the retransmission of distant non-network programming. Instead, Congress used a compulsory license system to guarantee cable television access to such programming while providing copyright owners some remuneration for its use. This comment analyzes the effect that retention of the compulsory license and other proposed changes to the Copyright Act would have on the supply of television programming in the absence of FCC regulations. The comment concludes that the evidence indicates retention of the compulsory license in the absence of signal importation regulations and protections for sports programming will have an adverse effect on the overall supply of television programming. Given the potential for harm, the comment calls for imposition of full copyright liability on cable television for the retransmission of distant non-network programming.
Keywords
  • cable television,
  • FCC Regulations,
  • compulsory license,
  • signal retransmission,
  • program suppply,
  • sports programming,
  • copyright
Disciplines
Publication Date
1982
Comments
First Place, ASCAP Nathan Burkan Memorial Competition (1982)
Citation Information
Andrew G. Ogden, The Effect of the Cable Television Compulsory License on Program Supply in a Deregulated Environment (Unpublished Comment 1982).
Creative Commons License
Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons CC_BY International License.