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Article
Was Thomas Jefferson trained for his profession? The learned versus trained hospitality student
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education (2001)
  • M. C. Dalbor, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Andrew H. Feinstein, San Jose State University
Abstract
Hospitality education has become increasingly specialized through the conversion of traditional business courses and limiting the generalized education of the learner in an effort to provide a meaningful hospitality-emphasized learning experience. Students who once studied a broader range of general courses are now seeing this instructional model shift to a highly specialized training curriculum. This paper utilizes the educational path of Thomas Jefferson—a man who did not train for a specific job, but instead had a general interest in education—as an example of an effective instructional model to develop critical-thinking skills in learners and to assist them in a successful hospitality-oriented career. The authors also argue that employers can teach students job skills, but hospitality programs may better serve their students by adopting more of a “liberal 3118” instructional model and integrating knowledge throughout the curriculum. Furthermore, this approach can be integrated into the hospitality curriculum in a relatively straightforward manner.
Publication Date
2001
Citation Information
M. C. Dalbor and Andrew H. Feinstein. "Was Thomas Jefferson trained for his profession? The learned versus trained hospitality student" Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Education Vol. 13 Iss. 1 (2001)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/andrew_feinstein/26/