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Article
Violence Directed Against Teachers: Results from a National Survey
Psychology in the Schools (2014)
  • Susan D. McMahon, DePaul University
  • Andrew Martinez, Sacred Heart University
  • Dorthy L Espelage, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Chad Rose, University of Missouri
  • Linda A. Reddy, Rutgers University - Newark
  • Kathleen Lane, University of Kansas
  • Eric M. Anderman, Ohio State University - Main Campus
  • Cecil R. Reynolds, West Texas A&M University
  • Abraham Jones, National Education Foundation
  • Veda Brown
Abstract
Teachers in U.S. schools report high rates of victimization, yet previous studies focus on select types of victimization and student perpetrators, which may underestimate the extent of the problem. This national study was based on work conducted by the American Psychological Association Classroom Violence Directed Against Teachers Task Force and is one of the few national studies to examine violence directed at teachers. Participants included 2,998 kindergarten through 12th-grade (K-12) teachers from 48 states who completed an anonymous web-based survey assessing their experiences with victimization. Results revealed that 80% of teachers reported at least one victimization, and of these teachers, 94% reported being victimized by students. Nearly three-fourths of all teachers experienced at least one harassment offense, more than half experienced property offenses, and 44% reported physical attacks. Findings suggest that specific teacher and community characteristics are associated with a higher likelihood of victimization, namely, male gender and urban settings; whereas, African American teachers were less likely to report victimization. Implications for teacher training, school interventions, public policy, and future research are discussed.

This study was based on the work of the American Psychological Association Classroom Violence Directed Against Teachers Task Force and supported by the American Psychological Association Board of Educational Affairs. The Task Force thanks the American Psychological Association Staff Contributors, Dr. Rena Subotnik, Ms. Ashley Edmiston, and Ms. Rochelle Rickoff.
Keywords
  • victimization,
  • student perpetrators,
  • education,
  • urban settings,
  • teacher training,
  • school interventions,
  • public policy
Publication Date
2014
DOI
DOI: 10.1002/pits.21777
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Citation Information
Mcmahon, S. D., Martinez, A., Espelage, D., Rose, C., Reddy, L. A., Lane, K., Anderman, E. M., Reynolds, C. R., Jones, A. and Brown, V. (2014), VIOLENCE DIRECTED AGAINST TEACHERS: RESULTS FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY. Psychol. Schs., 51: 753–766. doi:10.1002/pits.21777 OR at SHU Mcmahon, S. D., Martinez, A., Espelage, D., Rose, C., Reddy, L. A., Lane, K., Anderman, E. M., Reynolds, C. R., Jones, A. and Brown, V. (2014), VIOLENCE DIRECTED AGAINST TEACHERS: RESULTS FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY. Psychol. Schs., 51: 753–766. doi:10.1002/pits.21777. Retrieved from http://0-search.ebscohost.com.enterprise.sacredheart.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=96956199&site=ehost-live&scope=site