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Article
Other Peoples' Property: HipHop's Inherent Clashes with U.S. Property Laws and its Rise as Global Counter Culture
Virginia Sports and Entertainment Law Journal (2007)
  • Andre L Smith
Abstract
Because of hiphop's inherent clashes with property laws, many worldwide adopt hiphop as a culture in opposition to property owners. For many of the world's poor and subjugated, hiphop represents a non-propertied group successfully and stridently challenging the propertied and the social order maintaining their wealth. Surely, Public Enemy's Fight the Power promoted hiphop globally as an art form capable and worthy of adoption by those struggling for economic or social justice. But hiphop's worldwide appeal has less to do with its capacity for expressing political messages and more to do with its inherent opposition to property laws. It is the symbolic nature of hiphop's many current and historical battles with federal, state, and local property laws that inspires the world's poor youths to rap about their particular tribulations, breakdance, write graffiti, adopt hiphop fashion and language and express their opposition to their respective social systems through hiphop culture.
Keywords
  • hiphop,
  • music,
  • norms,
  • culture,
  • fair use
Publication Date
Fall 2007
Citation Information
Andre L Smith. "Other Peoples' Property: HipHop's Inherent Clashes with U.S. Property Laws and its Rise as Global Counter Culture" Virginia Sports and Entertainment Law Journal Vol. 7 (2007)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/andre_smith/13/