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Teacher Preparation and Language Policy Appropriation: A Qualitative Investigation of Teach for America Teacher in Arizona
Education Policy Analysis Archives
  • Amy J. Heineke, Loyola University Chicago
  • Quanna Cameron
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
4-1-2013
Disciplines
Abstract
In this qualitative study, we examined teachers’ language policy appropriation in the English-only state of Arizona. Specifically, we investigated teachers who received their professional placement and preparation through the Teach For America organization. We conducted the research in 2010 and 2011, a period when Arizona state language policy required that English learners be placed in English language development classrooms, separated from mainstream classrooms, to receive four hours of daily skill-based language instruction in language-specific content only, including grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, and conversation. Through analysis of interview data from seven current corps members and eight alumni teachers, we investigated whether and how professional preparation shaped teachers’ identity and agency to implement prescriptive linguistic and instructional mandates in the classroom.
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Author Posting. © Heineke and Cameron, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of the authors for personal use, not for redistribution. The article was published in Education Policy Analysis Archives, Volume 21, Issue 33, April 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.14507/epaa.v21n33.2013

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0
Citation Information
Heineke, A and Q Cameron. "Teacher Preparation and Language Policy Appropriation: A Qualitative Investigation of Teach for America Teacher in Arizona." Education Policy and Analysis Archives 21(33), 2013.