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Article
Rethinking college: Roles for school psychologists in transition planning for students with intellectual disability
Contemporary School Psychology (2016)
  • Felicia L. Wilczenski, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Amy Cook, University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Colleen Regal
Abstract
Transition from high school to postsecondary education (PSE) and employment can be challenging for all youth, and particularly for youth with intellectual disability (ID) who are more likely to remain in poverty compared to their peers without disabilities (Mock and Love, J Policy Pract Intellect Disabil, 9:289-297, 2012; Siperstein et al., J Vocat Rehabil, 39:157-160, 2013). In the USA, the critical transition period from adolescence to adulthood for students with ID is receiving increased attention. There have been significant advances in educational programming and PSE options for students with ID targeting academic growth, personal adjustment, and career development goals. Increasing access to PSE for students with ID is a shared responsibility, involving collaboration across a variety of service providers, including school psychologists. This article reviews transition challenges and programming opportunities as well as describes the roles that school psychologists can assume in identifying and providing effective support strategies to meet the postsecondary transition needs of students with ID.
Publication Date
2016
DOI
10.1007/s40688-016-0112-z
Citation Information
Felicia L. Wilczenski, Amy Cook and Colleen Regal. "Rethinking college: Roles for school psychologists in transition planning for students with intellectual disability" Contemporary School Psychology Vol. 21 (2016) p. 71 - 79
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/amy_cook/39/