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Article
The Use of Freshmen Seminar Programs to Deliver Personalized Feedback
Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education
  • Amber M. Henslee, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Christopher J. Correia
Abstract
The current study tested the effectiveness of delivering personalized feedback to first-semester college freshmen in a group lecture format. Participants enrolled in semester-long courses were randomly assigned to receive either personalized feedback or general information about alcohol. Both lecture conditions were delivered during a standard class period. Participants were reassessed after 5 weeks. Participants who received personalized feedback reported more accurate peer perceptions and higher readiness-to-change scores regarding personal alcohol use than participants who received general information. However, the results did not indicate group differences in alcohol use or alcohol-related consequences. These results support the use of freshmen seminar courses as a vehicle to provide personalized feedback to increase awareness of campus norms and increase motivation to change drinking behaviors.
Department(s)
Psychological Science
Document Type
Article - Journal
Document Version
Citation
File Type
text
Language(s)
English
Rights
© 2009 American Alcohol and Drug Information Foundation (Lansing), All rights reserved.
Publication Date
1-1-2009
Disciplines
Citation Information
Amber M. Henslee and Christopher J. Correia. "The Use of Freshmen Seminar Programs to Deliver Personalized Feedback" Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education Vol. 53 Iss. 3 (2009) p. 39 - 52 ISSN: 901482
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/amber-henslee/1/