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Article
Should online doctoral instructors adopt audio feedback as an instructional strategy? Preliminary Evidence.
International Journal of Doctoral Studies (2012)
  • Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw, Liberty University
Abstract
Literature supports that feedback is central to the learning process, and technology is central in the delivery of online education. Critical lines of research consistently identify two crucial vari-ables associated with effective online higher education: community and learning. Thus, the cur-rent study examined how audio and text feedback as compared written feedback can contribute to 125 online doctoral students’ sense of community and learning. The findings show that doctoral students who received audio and text feedback had better perceptions of their instructor and cog-nitive development than those who received written feedback. The students who received audio and text feedback also had better learning outcomes. There was no difference in social presence between the two groups. These results are consistent with qualitative research on audio and text feedback and are explained by media theory.
Disciplines
Publication Date
2012
Citation Information
Amanda J. Rockinson-Szapkiw. "Should online doctoral instructors adopt audio feedback as an instructional strategy? Preliminary Evidence." International Journal of Doctoral Studies Vol. 7 (2012)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/amanda_rockinson_szapkiw/48/