Skip to main content
Article
Preventing Disruptive Behavior in the Urban Classroom: Effects of the Good Behavior Game on Student and Teacher Behavior
Education and Treatment of Children
  • Amanda L. Lannie, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
2-1-2007
Abstract
Teachers are o�en ill-prepared to manage classrooms in urban schools. In the present study, an empirically-based behavioral management strategy, the Good Behavior Game (Game), was investigated. The effects of the Game on student behavior and teacher response statements, including praise, were examined. A teacher with 22 students in a first grade classroom of an urban elementary school participated in implementation of the Game. Using a withdrawal design, results showed that student on-task behavior increased while disruptive behavior decreased, replicating previous findings. The number of teacher praise statements remained at near zero levels across conditions. Frequency of teacher neutral and negative statements varied with the level of student disruptive behavior. Teacher praise and limitations are discussed.
Comments

This article was published in Education and Treatment of Children, Volume 30, Issue 1, Pages 85-98.

The published version is available at dx.doi.org/10.1353/etc.2007.0002.

Copyright © 2007.

Citation Information
Amanda L. Lannie. "Preventing Disruptive Behavior in the Urban Classroom: Effects of the Good Behavior Game on Student and Teacher Behavior" Education and Treatment of Children Vol. 30 Iss. 1 (2007) p. 85 - 98
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/amanda-lannie/5/