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Article
Carlos Fuente's "The Two Shores": Between Counterfactualism and Cultural Allegory
Modern Languages & Literature
  • Alberto Ribas-Casasayas, Santa Clara University
Document Type
Article
Publication Date
1-1-2009
Publisher
Romance Notes, Department of Romance Languages University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3170
Abstract

A literary criticism of the short story "The Two Shores," which appeared in the 1992 book "The Orange Tree," by Carlos Fuentes. The plot and characters of the story are described, particularly the narrator, Jerónimo de Aguilar, a dead man who was held captive by the Mayans. The story is a contribution to the reconsideration of the Spanish conquest of the Americas, particularly Mexico. The idea that the story may present a counterfactual historiography, an idea created by critic Niall Ferguson, is considered.

Comments
Originally published by Romance Notes, Vol. 49, No. 3, 2009, pp. 301-312. Permission to re-deposit granted by Romance Notes.
Citation Information
RIBAS, A. (2009). CARLOS FUENTES'S "THE TWO SHORES": BETWEEN COUNTERFACTUALISM AND CULTURAL ALLEGORY. Romance Notes, 49(3), 301-311.