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Cemeteries are effective sites for monitoring La Crosse virus (LACv) and these environments may play a role in LACv infection
PLOS ONE (2015)
  • Rebecca T Fryxell
  • Kimberly Freyman
  • Armando Ulloa
  • Brian Hendricks
  • Dave Paulsen
  • Agricola Odoi
  • Abelardo Moncayo
Abstract
La Crosse encephalitis (LAC) is the leading arboviral disease among children, and was previously limited to the upper Midwest. In 2012 nine pediatric cases of LAC occurred in eastern Tennessee, including one fatal case. In an attempt to identify sites near an active LACv infection and describe the abundance and distribution of potential LACv vectors near a fatal LAC case in the Appalachian region, we initiated an end of season study using a combination of questing and oviposition mosquito traps placed at forty-nine sites consisting of cemeteries and houses within 16 radial kilometers of two pediatric infections. LACv was isolated from three Aedes triseriatus pools collected from cemeteries and spatial clustering analysis identified clusters of Ae. triseriatus and Ae. albopictus populations that overlapped in the same area as the 2012 LACv cases. Results indicate cemeteries are effective sites for monitoring LACv. The role of cemeteries and specific environmental features will be the focus of future investigations.
Disciplines
Publication Date
April 10, 2015
DOI
10.1371/journal.pone.0122895
Citation Information
Rebecca T Fryxell, Kimberly Freyman, Armando Ulloa, Brian Hendricks, et al.. "Cemeteries are effective sites for monitoring La Crosse virus (LACv) and these environments may play a role in LACv infection" PLOS ONE Vol. 10 Iss. 4 (2015) p. e0122895
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/agricola_odoi/52/