Skip to main content
Article
Effect of ketamine on the minimum infusion rate of propofol needed to prevent motor movement in dogs
American Journal of Veterinary Research (2015)
  • Rachel Reed, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Mohamed Reza Seddighi, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Agricola Odoi, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Thomas J Doherty, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Abstract
OBJECTIVE To determine the minimum infusion rate (MIR) of propofol required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus in dogs anesthetized with propofol alone or propofol in combination with a constant rate infusion (CRI) of ketamine. ANIMALS 6 male Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized on 3 occasions, at weekly intervals, with propofol alone (loading dose, 6 mg/kg; initial CRI, 0.45 mg/kg/min), propofol (loading dose, 5 mg/kg; initial CRI, 0.35 mg/kg/min) and a low dose of ketamine (loading dose, 2 mg/kg; CRI, 0.025 mg/kg/min), or propofol (loading dose, 4 mg/kg; initial CRI, 0.3 mg/kg/min) and a high dose of ketamine (loading dose, 3 mg/kg; CRI, 0.05 mg/kg/min). After 60 minutes, the propofol MIR required to prevent movement in response to a noxious electrical stimulus was determined in duplicate. RESULTS Least squares mean ± SEM propofol MIRs required to prevent movement in response to the noxious stimulus were 0.76 ± 0.1 mg/kg/min, 0.60 ± 0.1 mg/kg/min, and 0.41 ± 0.1 mg/kg/min when dogs were anesthetized with propofol alone, propofol and low-dose ketamine, and propofol and high-dose ketamine, respectively. There were significant decreases in the propofol MIR required to prevent movement in response to the noxious stimulus when dogs were anesthetized with propofol and low-dose ketamine (27 ± 10%) or with propofol and high-dose ketamine (30 ± 10%). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Ketamine, at the doses studied, significantly decreased the propofol MIR required to prevent movement in response to a noxious stimulus in dogs.
Publication Date
Fall December, 2015
Citation Information
Rachel Reed, Mohamed Reza Seddighi, Agricola Odoi and Thomas J Doherty. "Effect of ketamine on the minimum infusion rate of propofol needed to prevent motor movement in dogs" American Journal of Veterinary Research Vol. 76 Iss. 12 (2015)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/agricola_odoi/41/