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Strain, Self-control, and spousal violence: A study of husband-to-wife violence in Hong Kong
Violence and Victims (2014)
  • Yuet-wah Cheung
  • Susanne Yuk-Ping Choi
  • Adam Ka-Lok Cheung, The Hong Kong Institute of Education
Abstract

This study examines the applicability of Agnew’s strain theory and Gottfredson and Hirschi’s self-control theory in explaining husband-to-wife psychological aggression and physical assault in a community survey of 871 couples in Hong Kong. Three strains, each belonging to 1 type of Agnew’s types of strain, were selected, namely, dissatisfaction with family financial situation, dissatisfaction with relationship with spouse, and physical abuse by parents in childhood. Self-control was measured with a simplified version of 12 items selected from the 24-item Self-control Scale developed by Grasmick, Tittle, Bursik, and Ameklev (1993). The conditioning effect of self-control on the relationship between strain and husband-to-wife violence was also examined. Results show that 2 of the 3 types of strain and self-control significantly affected both types of spousal violence. In addition, self-control has a conditioning effect on the relationship between strain and husband-to-wife violence, reducing the likelihood of strain leading to violence. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

Publication Date
April 1, 2014
Citation Information
Cheung, Y. W., Choi, S. Y. P., & Cheung, A. K. L. (2014). Strain, Self-control, and spousal violence: A study of husband-to-wife violence in Hong Kong. Violence & Victims, 29(2), 280-299.