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Article
The Bourgeosie will fall forever:the New York Tribune, the 1848 French Revolution, and American social democratic discourse.
Journal of American History (2005)
  • Adam-Max Tuchinsky, University of Southern Maine
Abstract

Analyzes how the social democratic commitments of Horace Greeley and his newspaper, the 'New York Tribune,' shaped the free-labor ideology of the Whigs and the radical wing of the Republican Party in the antebellum period. In the 1840's, the debate between Greeley, who was committed to an American version of Fourierist socialist reform, and Henry Raymond, who viewed socialism as a threat to traditional American ideals, illustrated the sharp ideological divisions within the Whig Party. Although Fourierism as a movement failed, its critique of capitalism is reflected in the response to radical social, economic, and political reform in reports on the 1848 revolution in France written by Henry Böstein, the 'Tribune''s correspondent in Paris. The effects of the events of 1848 - the discrediting of Fourierist idealism and the shifting of attention to issues of class, power, politics, and violence - shaped the 'Tribune''s approach to socialist reform in the 1850's. During this period, Karl Marx was a regular contributor, and the paper turned to more pragmatic and class-bound solutions to the problem of labor such as land reform, homestead legislation, and labor cooperatives.

Disciplines
Publication Date
September, 2005
Citation Information
Adam-Max Tuchinsky. "The Bourgeosie will fall forever:the New York Tribune, the 1848 French Revolution, and American social democratic discourse." Journal of American History Vol. 92 Iss. 2 (2005)
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/adam-max_tuchinsky/2/