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Article
Peace and stability in Somalia: problems and prospects
UFAHUMU: Journal of the African Activist Association (1994)
  • Abdi M. Kusow, Wayne State University
Abstract
This article examines the root causes of the current civil strife in Somalia and suggests possible sociopolitical reconstruction modes, i.e. alternative sociopolitical models which are appropriate to the linguistic and clan realities of the country. It argues that the causes of the current civil strife and the resulting famine are far deeper than 'warlordism'. The civil strife can in large measure be attributed to the traditional mode of production (pastoralism and agropastoralism), the harsh natural environment, misguided development policies, failed national integration models, and modern clannism, which has taken the shape of a stratified class structure with some clans situated at the top of the hierarchy. In other words, the crisis can be attributed to a competition for resources based on clan/class divisions. As a solution to the crisis, the author suggests the decentralization of authority and the promotion of popular participation based on voluntary association instead of forced national integration. This would imply the creation of a federal system of government based on semiregional autonomy.
Publication Date
1994
Citation Information
Abdi M. Kusow. "Peace and stability in Somalia: problems and prospects" UFAHUMU: Journal of the African Activist Association Vol. 22 Iss. 1–2 (1994) p. 25 - 40 ISSN: 0041-5715
Available at: http://works.bepress.com/abdi_kusow/4/