Ralph M. Rosen (B.A. in Greek and Latin, Swarthmore College, 1977; MA, PhD in
Classical Philology, Harvard University, 1983) is the Rose Family Endowed Term Professor
of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. His scholarly interests lie
broadly in Greek and Roman literature and intellectual history, with particular focus on
ancient comic and satirical poetic genres. He has published widely on archaic and
classical Greek poetry, and has recently completed a new book about ancient poetic
mockery and satire (Making Mockery: The Poetics of Ancient Satire, forthcoming Oxford
University Press, 2007). Other interests within Classical Studies include ancient
medicine and philosophy; much of his current work concerns the Hippocratic tradition and
the 2nd-C C.E. medical writer, Galen. 

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Aristophanes, Fandom and the Classicizing of Greek Tragedy, Departmental Papers (Classical Studies) (2006)

It is no doubt true that the questions I would like to address in this...

 

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Comic Aischrology and the Urbanization of Agroikia, Departmental Papers (Classical Studies) (2006)

In the preceding chapter, Helen Cullyer has lucidly shown just how complex, even contradictory, the...

 

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Aristophanes, Old Comedy and Greek Tragedy, Departmental Papers (Classical Studies) (2005)

In a famous scene at the end of Plato's symposium, after a high-minded philosophical discussion...

 

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Aristophanes' Frogs and the Contest of Homer and Hesiod, Departmental Papers (Classical Studies) (2004)

Dionysus' unexpected decision at the end of the play is generally thought to reflect the...

 

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Revisiting Sophocles' Poimenes: Tragedy or Satyr Play?, Departmental Papers (Classical Studies) (2003)