Laura S. Guy obtained her PhD in clinical (forensic) psychology at Simon Fraser
University in 2008. She completed a two-year postdoctoral fellowship (dual focus on
research and clinical-forensic assessment) at the University of Massachusetts Medical
School in 2010. She currently is an Assistant Professor at the Center for Mental Health
Services Research within the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts
Medical School. 

Dr. Guy’s primary research interests lie at the nexus of psychology and the legal system
(‘forensic psychology’). Her work focuses on the assessment and management of risk for
crime and violence among juveniles and adults. Within this domain, she conducts research
on different approaches to assessing risk as well as research on variables that are
related to risk, such as mental disorder. Another related area of work concerns the
construct of psychopathic personality disorder, including measurement of the construct,
its relation to crime, and its impact on jury decision-making. Dr. Guy also conducts
research on the effectiveness of interventions for reducing risk and preventing
reoffending. She currently is Principal Investigator on a prospective study evaluating a
treatment program for women with histories of perpetrating intimate partner violence. She
is co-Principal Investigator on a federal grant to conduct a prospective evaluation of a
new community-based program that offers services to women being discharged from
incarceration who have mental disorders and co-occurring substance abuse problems. 

She has conducted training workshops for mental health clinicians and probation officers
regarding violence risk assessment using tools developed according to the structured
professional judgment approach to decision-making (HCR-20, SAVRY). As part of her
consultation role to the National Youth Screening Assessment Project (part of the Models
for Change Research Network funded by the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur
Foundation), she provides consultation to juvenile justice systems that have implemented
risk/needs assessment tools. 

Dr. Guy recently won the Early Career Achievement Award in Forensic Clinical Practice,
Research and Policy, given by the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health. 

Articles

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No sympathy for the devil: attributing psychopathic traits to capital murderers also predicts support for executing them (with John F. Edens, Karen M. Davis, and Krissie Fernandez Smith), Personality disorders (2013)
 

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Impact of risk/needs assessment on juvenile probation officers' decision making: Importance of implementation (with Gina M. Vincent, Melissa Paiva-Salisbury, Nathan E. Cook, and Rachael T. Perrault), Psychology, Public Policy, and Law (2012)
 

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Does Risk Assessment Make a Difference? Results of Implementing the SAVRY in Juvenile Probation (with Gina M. Vincent, Bernice G. Gershenson, and Patrick J. McCabe), Behavioral sciences and the law (2012)
 

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MISSION Community Re-Entry for Women (MISSION-CREW) Program Development and Implementation (with Debra A. Pinals, Carl E. Fulwiler, Andrea Leverentz, Stephanie W. Hartwell, and Elizabeth Aaker Orvek), Psychiatry Information in Brief (2011)
 

Link

On Being an Expert Witness: It's Not About You (with Joel A. Dvoskin), Psychiatry, Psychology and Law (2011)
 

Presentations

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Gender: An Important Factor in the Implementation of Services for Juvenile Offenders (with Geno Salomone, Rebecca J. Nelson, Scarlet P. Woods, and Gina M. Vincent), Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center Publications and Presentations (2013)
 

Other

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Risk Assessment in Juvenile Justice: A Guidebook for Implementation (with Gina M. Vincent and Thomas Grisso), Center for Mental Health Services Research Publications and Presentations (2012)
 

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Empirical Support for the HCR‐20: A Critical Analysis of the Violence Literature (with Catherine M. Wilson), Center for Mental Health Services Research (2007)
 

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HCR-20 Violence Risk Assessment Scheme: Overview and Annotated Bibliography (with Kevin S. Douglas, Kim A. Reeves, and John Weir), Center for Mental Health Services Research (2005)